Expert Consultation Workshop on "Mainstreaming Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services into Community Forestry in Nepal"

Background of the report

The only one outcome of the project is mainstreaming of the biodiversity and ecosystem services into community forests alongside livelihood improvement, creating conditions for poverty alleviation and resilience among community forest-users in Nepal through capacity development, tools, policy and process.

Therefore, to get the desired result, Bird Conservation Nepal, Birdlife International in collaboration with department of forest and FECOFUN have been carrying out various activities to benefit people and nature.

Recently on 3rd and 4th March 2016, the team has successfully conducted two expert consultation workshops at Hotel Summit, Kupondole, Lalitpur, Nepal. The main objectives of two days’ workshop was to develop outline of the biodiversity supplement for the production of an official biodiversity supplement to national community forest management guidelines, and to agree and design content of training materials, tools and guidelines; and develop approach for integration of biodiversity and ecosystem services training modules into curricula and content of existing training courses of DoF and FECOFUN simultaneously.

Participants

Total 26 participants on 3rd March (day one) and 26 participants on 4th March (day two) representing, Department of Forest (DoF), Forest Training Centers, Department of National Park and Wildlife Conservation (DNPWC), Department of Forest Research and Survey,  FECOFUN, Green Foundation, Forest Action, BirdLife International, Himawoti, National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC),  Forestry Experts, media persons, Small Earth Nepal, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), TU,  BCN, ANSAB,  were present on that workshop.

The Expert Consultation Workshop

On 3rd March (first day), workshop was opened by a short welcome speech delivered by Anuj Raj Sharma, DDG, DoF, CFD, Thakur Bhandari, Secretariat Member, FECOFUN and Dr. Narendra Man Babu Pradhan, CEO, BCN. They all, basically stressed on the immediate necessity of the workshop and proper implementation of its findings throughout the country.   Ishana Thapa, Senior Conservation Officer, BCN stated the detail introduction and objectives of the project and workshop. Under the technical session, Dr. Rajendra KC from Department of Forest Research and Survey presented the case study and Dr. Bhuwan Keshar Sharma, TU presented an in-depth desk review of integrating biodiversity and ecosystem services into community forestry management in Nepal. Similarly, Prakash Lamsal, Under Secretary, DoF, CFD highlighted the policies and practices on integrating biodiversity into community forestry in Nepal. Billy Fairburn from BirdLife International introduced a framework for mainstreaming biodiversity into community forestry and Jenny Marriman also from BirdLife International highlighted the gaps in integrating biodiversity and ecosystem services in the current community forestry management. An outline of biodiversity supplement was developed through group discussion in the following ways and future steps were also agreed:

  1. Understand the context, needs and capacity of CFUGs
    1. General meeting and focus group discussions
    2. A field visit to the CF
    3. Capacity needs identification
    4. Including women and marginal groups
  2. Identify and prioritize key biodiversity and ecosystem services within the CF
    1. Review existing data
    2. Collect new data (using PRA and biodiversity inventory)
    3. Identify key climate change risks and other threats (e.g. invasive alien species)
  3. Identify biodiversity and ecosystem services benefits and opportunities for the CFUG
    1. Undertake ES assessment
    2. Document resources and traditional knowledge
    3. Livelihood assessment
    4. Vulnerability assessment and potential for EbA
    5. Identify current practices and opportunities for benefit sharing
    6. Identify opportunities to improve livelihoods and wellbeing
  4. Assess biodiversity and ecosystem services in the CF, and social. equity factors
    1. Ensure assessment is transparent, inclusive and participatory
  5. Action planning for implementation
    1. Prepare data collection guidelines
    2. Establish CBM protocol
    3. ES valuation guidelines
    4. Ensure implementation plan is incorporated into OP
    5. Establish monitoring plan for implementation
  6. Implement plan, monitor biodiversity and ecosystem services
    1. Simple community based monitoring of biodiversity/ES, including social factors (e.g. benefit sharing)
  7. Review plan  and revise if needed
  8. Participatory monitoring and evaluation of plan implementation

On the second day of the workshop (4th March), the objective was to develop training outline linked to biodiversity supplement. The overall presentations were more focused on capacity development for integrating biodiversity and ecosystem services into community forestry. Under Secretary from CFTEC Mr. Nabin Prasad Upadhyaya and Mr. Bodh Raj Subedi presented on Issues and Challenges, and New Forestry Policy and Strategy Process, on capacity development for Integrating Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services into Community Forestry in Nepal, respectively.

A plenary discussion was carried to identify level of trainees and possible ways of sustaining the training beyond the project followed by a group discussion on main focus group of the training, methods of training and the training period. The workshop was concluded agreeing to initiate the development of training linking with the supplement framework in following way:

  1. The capacity at the level of forest officer and other potential trainees

 

Gap

Level-I officer

Level-II non officer & cbm executive member  (Mid tec)

Level-III

LRP and sheranibihin

(Junior level)

 

Sensitization

Need to some extent

as bird eye.

Holistic.

High degree

Moderate

Resource Identification (Biodiversity/PES- Knowledge, skill )

Moderate.

High.

High.

Inventory

Moderate.

High.

High

Assessment- tools and techniques

High

High

Moderate

Prioritization and trade off.

High

High

Know how.

Decision.

High

Moderate

Moderate

Plan incorporation.

High

Moderate

Moderate

MER (Monitoring, Evaluation and reporting)

High

Moderate

Know how.

  1. Training methods will work best for Forest officer and other stakeholders

Training methods

1. Class room (In-house) methods

  • Lecture
  • Group discussion
  • Braining storming
  • class room exercise (group work)
  • Case study exercise
  • Use of training materials (Audio visuals, games.)
  • Buzz grouping.

Training methods

2. Field work methods

  • Observation
  • Rapport building + interaction
  •  Field exercise (PRA, RRA, measurement, interaction, personal contact.)
  • Demonstration (practical exercise.)
  • Data collection (social+technical)
  • Documentation (forms, records collection)

3. Report presentation

  • Data analysis
  • Presentation preparation
  • Presentation
  • Feed-back collection
  • Conclusion

4. Evaluation

  • Presentation (Group+individuals)
  • Exam (Awards distribution)

 

  1. Detailed structure of training – what would this look like?
  1. Ranger/Officer/LRP Level

Objective: Skill Transfer and Operational Plans Preparation

Duration: 7 days (Theory: 2 days, Practical: 2 days, Data analysis: 2 days, Presentation and discussion: 1 day)

Resource person: Officer

Qualification of participants: At least one year experience (LRP- Level 2 pass + one year) experience

  1. Forest Guard Level + LRP

Objective: Skill Transfer for information Collection

Duration: 7 days (Theatrical: 3 days, Field Practice: 2 days, Data /information tabulation: 1 day

Reporting/ presentation and Discussion: 1 day)

Resource person: Officer

Qualification of Participants: 10 pass and at least 1 year field experience (LRP- 1st level pass with one year experience

  1. Officer Level

Objective: TOT and Mentoring to field staff

Duration: 5 days

Theory: 2 days (Field visit + Practice: 1 day, Information Analysis: 1 day, Report with what next: 1 day)

Resource person: Expert in Subject